As COVID-19 vaccines roll out around the globe there is a feeling that something about the way we have lived has ended and a new way of life is beginning. How many times in history has this been true for the whole world: that a single event has irrevocably changed the way we live on a global scale? This question spans human history but can also be considered across the existence of the Earth – some 4.2 billion years.

Our feature article examines the collision of two world changing events – COVID-19 and the technological revolution that has produced the internet, social media and Wi-Fi. Sarah Foster presents a detailed review of the impact of COVID-19 and Wi-Fi on the younger community in her article: The Impact on Mental Health of Children and Young People During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic.

In light of the traumatic implications of these current events we have been able to publish another excerpt from trauma specialist Babette Rothschild from an introduction to her recent publication, Revolutionising Trauma Treatment (see May issue). She provides insight into the motivations and subsequent thinking that led to the writing of her book.

A new case study from Roger Keizerstein, Through Illness, A Veteran Faces and Overcomes His Painful Past, examines the case of a Vietnam veteran dealing with paralysing anxiety. The case reveals the vulnerability of the client and the importance of accuracy in diagnosis. These case studies are invaluable in deepening our appreciation of the therapeutic experience.

But, as a reminder that despite these social changes, there is much about the human psyche that has not changed, Gunnel Minett reviews a new book about Carl Jung. Decoding Jung’s Metaphysics: The archetypal semantics of an experiential universe by Bernardo Kastrup, takes us deeply into Jung’s contribution to our understanding of our vulnerabilities and fragilities as we struggle to manage a world that seems to be changing beneath our feet.

How do we best make these social behavioural changes within the context of our naturally qualities? The conundrum first presented by French author John-Baptiste Alphonse Karr in 1849 remains: The more things change the more things stay the same. We wish everybody well and we look forward to a world that is able to embrace change, while, at the same time, become more fully engaged with our natural capacities as evolved human beings.

RICHARD HILL | EDITOR

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