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The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy
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Lou Cozolino and his pocket guide to neuroscience

Lou Cozolino and his pocket guide to neuroscience

  It's always a treat to have Lou on the show and to tap into his years of experience in the field and in his extensive research he does for his many books. Once again Lou Cozolino releases another book! This time it's the Pocket Guide to Neuroscience for...

Now we understand vision better because of mapped neural circuits found in the eye

Now we understand vision better because of mapped neural circuits found in the eye

The function of a special group of nerve cells which are found in the eye and which sense visual movement have been discovered by researchers from Aarhus University. A completely new understanding of how conscious sensory impressions occur in the brain has been acquired through the study. The development of targeted and specific forms of treatment in the future for diseases which impact the nervous system and its sensory apparatus, such as dementia and schizophrenia, needs this kind of insight.

Dreams, Synchrony, and Synchronicity

Dreams, Synchrony, and Synchronicity

This excerpt taken from A Fractal Epistemology for a Scientific Psychology - Bridging the Personal with the Transpersonal edited by Terry Marks-Tarlow, Yakov Shapiro, Katthe P. Wolf. Published by Cambridge Scholars. Reproduced with permission of the publisher. ...

The Science of Psychotherapy May 2020

The Science of Psychotherapy May 2020

In the month since writing my last editorial the world has experienced an almost unprecedented turmoil. The covid-19 virus has affected us all, as it infected millions. Sadly, many lives have been lost. It is hard to imagine this extent of loss of life. In my 66 years...

Robert Moss on treating chronic pain

Robert Moss on treating chronic pain

  Dr Robert Moss is a clinical psychologist and researcher who's near 40 years of experience in the field has given him deep insight into the workings of the brain and especially in areas of memory and pain perception. Today we are going to talk to him about an...

Aha! + Aaaah: Neural Reward Signal Is Triggered By Creative Insight

Aha! + Aaaah: Neural Reward Signal Is Triggered By Creative Insight

Creativity is one of humanity’s most distinctive abilities and enduring mysteries. Innovative ideas and solutions have enabled our species to survive existential threats and thrive. Yet, creativity cannot be necessary for survival because many species that do not possess it have managed to flourish far longer than humans. So what drove the evolutionary development of creativity?

Michael Yapko and the Mindset App

Michael Yapko and the Mindset App

Michael Yapko, legendary outcome-focused clinical psychologist and hypnosis expert, has teamed up with a couple of young Australian entrepreneurs, Chris and Alex Naoumidis, to create a very useful phone app for therapists and their clients. We find out all about it in...

Dementia is not necessarily kept at bay by an aspirin a day

Dementia is not necessarily kept at bay by an aspirin a day

Taking a low-dose aspirin once a day does not reduce the risk of thinking and memory problems caused by mild cognitive impairment or probable Alzheimer’s disease, nor does it slow the rate of cognitive decline, according to a large study published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

What do we lose first, brain or muscles?

What do we lose first, brain or muscles?

UNIGE researchers have shown that the decline in cognitive abilities after 50 years of age results in a decline in physical activity, and that – contrary to what has been suggested by the literature to date – the inverse relationship is much weaker.

Coronavirus Books for Children

Coronavirus Books for Children

Chloe Drulis and Mary Gianatasio are child development specialists who wrote two books to help children understand and cope with the effects of the coronavirus on their lives. The books are as follows: 1. What is the Coronavirus? reframes the international crisis from...

Stroke: The Second Time That The System Fails

Stroke: The Second Time That The System Fails

After a stroke, there is an increased risk of suffering a second one. If areas in the left hemisphere were affected during the first attack, language is often impaired. In order to maintain this capability, the brain usually briefly drives up the counterparts on the right side. But what happens after a second attack? Medical researchers have now found an answer by using virtual lesions.