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How neurons get past “no”

How neurons get past “no”

Inhibitory neurons target the weakest-responding neurons in the brain to facilitate transmission of signals When looking at a complex landscape, the eye needs to focus in on important details without losing the big picture—a charging lion in a jungle, for example....

Running to music helps combat mental fatigue

Running to music helps combat mental fatigue

Listening to music while running might be the key to improving people’s performance when they feel mentally fatigued a study suggests. The performance of runners who listened to a self-selected playlist after completing a demanding thinking task was at the same level...

Non-invasive potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease

Non-invasive potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease

Ultrasound can overcome some of the detrimental effects of ageing and dementia without the need to cross the blood-brain barrier, Queensland Brain Institute researchers have found. Professor Jürgen Götz led a multidisciplinary team at QBI’s Clem Jones Centre for...

Inflammatory proteins may slow cognitive decline in aging adults

Inflammatory proteins may slow cognitive decline in aging adults

An unexpected discovery: Inflammatory proteins may slow cognitive decline in aging adults Research has previously linked inflammation to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), yet scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Harvard Aging Brain Study (HABS) have...

Picky neurons

Picky neurons

In the visual thalamus, neurons are in contact with both eyes but respond to only one The visual thalamus is classically known to relay visual stimuli coming from the retina to the cerebral cortex. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology now show...

Rachel Zoffness talks Pain Management

Rachel Zoffness talks Pain Management

Dr. Rachel Zoffness is a pain & health psychologist, medical consultant, author, speaker, and expert on nonpharmacological approaches to pain management. She is an Assistant Clinical Professor at the UCSF School of Medicine, where she teaches pain education for...

The Science of Psychotherapy June 2021

The Science of Psychotherapy June 2021

This past year with COVID-19 has revealed how we are all equally vulnerable to this microscopic assailant. On the positive side, many have felt a sense of commonality and connection with people in countries previously given little thought. Ironically, separation has...

Dr Moshe Perl talks neurofeedback

Dr Moshe Perl talks neurofeedback

Dr. Moshe Perl is a world-class expert in neurofeedback and QEEG/EEG analysis, areas in which he has almost two-decades of experience teaching and mentoring practitioners in Australia and internationally. He has successfully treated well over a thousand patients and...

Memory for Therapists

Memory for Therapists

Memory Core Resource for The Science of Psychotherapy Standard Members Recall of memory is a creative process. What the brain stores is thought to be only a core memory. Upon recall, this core memory is then elaborated upon and reconstructed, with subtractions,...

Genetics for therapists

Genetics for therapists

The Science of Psychotherapy Core Resource on Genetics The body itself is an information procesor. Memory resides not just in brains but in every cell. No wonder genetics bloomed along with information theory. DNA is the quintessential information molecule, the most...

Covid-19 Alters Gray Matter Volume in the Brain, New Study Finds

Covid-19 Alters Gray Matter Volume in the Brain, New Study Finds

Covid-19 patients who receive oxygen therapy or experience fever show reduced gray matter volume in the frontal-temporal network of the brain, according to a new study led by researchers at Georgia State University and the Georgia Institute of Technology.  The...

New findings linking brain immune system to psychosis

New findings linking brain immune system to psychosis

New research at Karolinska Institutet suggests a link between psychosis and a genetic change that affects the brain's immune system. The study published in Molecular Psychiatry may impact the development of modern medicines for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia....

Eating more fruit and vegetables linked to less stress

Eating more fruit and vegetables linked to less stress

Eating a diet rich in fruit and vegetables is associated with less stress, according to new research from Edith Cowan University (ECU). The study examined the link between fruit and vegetable intake and stress levels of more than 8,600 Australians aged between 25 and...

Brain mechanism of curiosity

Brain mechanism of curiosity

Curiosity is the motivational drive for exploring and investigating the unknown and making new discoveries. It is as essential and intrinsic for survival as hunger. Until recently, the brain mechanisms underlying curiosity and novelty seeking behavior were unclear....