Today is part 2 of our talk with Joseph LeDoux about the deep history of ourselves.

Joseph LeDoux is the Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Science at NYU in the Center for Neural Science, and he directs the Emotional Brain Institute of NYU and the Nathan Kline Institute. He also a Professor of Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical School. His work is focused on the brain mechanisms of memory and emotion and he is the author of The Emotional Brain, Synaptic Self, and Anxious. LeDoux has received a number of awards, including William James Award from the Association for Psychological Science, the Karl Spencer Lashley Award from the American Philosophical Society, the Fyssen International Prize in Cognitive Science, Jean Louis Signoret Prize of the IPSEN Foundation, the Santiago Grisolia Prize, the American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award, and the American Psychological Association Donald O. Hebb Award. His book Anxious received the 2016 William James Book Award from the American Psychological Association. LeDoux is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

He is also the lead singer and songwriter in the rock band, The Amygdaloids and performs with Colin Dempsey as the acoustic duo So We Are.

(For more about Joseph go to his website HERE. For a more extensive bio see Joseph E. LeDoux on Wikipedia)

 


The Amygdaloids
are a New York City band made up of scientists who shed their scientific garb at night and take to the stage with songs about love and life peppered with insights drawn from research about mind and brain and mental disorders.

 

Integrating Knowledge Into Practice

with Matthew Dahlitz

We All Need Integration

We all know about the pressures of our profession, we tell our colleagues to be mindful of workload, we wonder why friends and colleagues took so long to get some help.

It’s a simple fact that the mental health professions are at a high risk for burnout, vicarious trauma, and other stressors about clients, systems, and money.

I Can Help

After a decade of producing and developing The Neuropsychotherapist and The Science of Psychotherapy I have engaged with, published and brought into our Academy expert contributors from around the world. This has given me a wide ranging, interdisciplinary knowledge that can be of great value to you. The real key is to know how to integrate that knowledge into your professional practice. Together we can “join the dots” in your practice and life in areas like:

  • the science of your practice
  • integrative practice and approach
  • burn out | vicarious trauma
  • overwhelm
  • imposter syndrome

I’m making myself available to anyone in our Science of Psychotherapy community, wherever you are in the world, for online counseling and consultation. I won’t replace your supervisor, but I can be a valuable human resource for you.

How: Online video conferencing using Zoom

We all need support. I look forward to connecting with you online whenever you need.

Matthew Dahlitz

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